update on Saranbileg

no clothes… I was going to post a warning like i do on bjd forums when i post pics of figures with no clothes, but then….
hmmm, i see a trend here…. i think i’ve done 1 figure with clothes (nope, make that 2 figures with clothes) in the last 3 years or so.

maybe i need to give that to myself as a challenge – do 2 more with clothing. preferably something awesome like sculpted kimonos and steampunk buckles and leathers and gears…..

ahem. ok, stop the mental rambling, back to the post at hand…

Saranbileg is a head for Therese Olsen’s Twiglimbs 2 body…. i posted pics awhile back where she was preparing for casting, and Saran looked like a terracotta soldier…

here she is in resin with a faceup by Meagan…
Saran in white resin with faceup and hair

Saran in white resin with faceup and hair
Saran in white resin with faceup and hair

I do love how alive they can look in the resin… makes a pleasant contrast to the dreamlike white of the premier clay…

the bone dragon’s daughter – update

madly emulating bone…. i wonder, if the dragon’s spine is roughly 27″ long, and i have until about July 20th, i guess i need to be applying bone at about 1 1/2″ per night. of course – that doesn’t include the ribs, the feet and talons… hmm, don’t think i counted in the neck on the dragon…. and the lady isn’t finished yet. and there isn’t a base yet…

sheesh.
work in progress - armature for the bone dragon's daughter

lola in resin!

ok, this last year I set myself a goal to achieve a bjd in resin. I love bjds – i love the idea of being able to play with them, to move them around and for them to be relatively small but fairly sturdy. In my head, i have strange moving insect people, or slithering sea creatures and more….

But before I can start one of these, i needed to work thru some hangups i had about jointing the limbs (I’ve started lots of bjds over the years – but never gotten much past the heads and torsos). I also had to learn to make silicon molds, learn to cast in resin, learn to clean up the blamed things (its amazing how much sanding goes into preparing a doll for molding — and how many time you have to make new molds. resin is very unforgiving, every single wrinkle, bump and fingerprint shows up in the resin, even if you can’t see them in the polymer or paperclay original)

i was really lucky, my daughter Meg started working with me, and kept me going when my short attention span might have urged me to move on to something else…. unfortunately she turned out to have allergies to the resin and the mold material. Fortunately my son Nate stepped in and started making the molds and helping clean up the casts…. years of WarHammer really paid off ( for me anyway!)

I decided to start with a very simple bjd, Lola – 8″ tall (9″ with her high heel feet) about 22 separate pieces —- she looks very different in the resin than she did in the polymer original — and she is definitely not a slithery sea creature, but she taught me what I needed to learn, and I think she turned out pretty well. Anyway – she is lots of fun to play with….

this is how she started out :

Lola - polymer and wood prototype

and this is how she looks in resin :

Lola - bjd in resin
Lola - bjd in resin
Lola - bjd in resin
Lola - bjd in resin
Lola - bjd in resin
Lola - bjd in resin
Lola - bjd in resin
Lola - bjd in resin